Track 3 : In the future action research will go underground ?

Curating: Barbara Van Dyck (Université Libre de Bruxelles)
Madrinas/Padrinos: Michael Edwards (University College London) & Chiara Tornaghi (TBC) (Coventry University)

  • Session 3.1. Objects of Policy, Subjects of Politics. Framing Social Movements in the Post-Colonial Global South

    OPEN SESSION

    Host and Presentor: Prathiwi Putri (Copenhagen University)

    Presentor: Hendro Sangkoyo (School of democratic economics, Indionesia)

  • Session Details

    A central aim of this workshop is to re-contextualise the analytical features of Social Innovation (SI) and territorial development (Moulaert, 2009; Moulaert & Jessop, 2013; Moulaert & Leontidou, 1994; Moulaert et al., 2010; Moulaert & Nussbaumer, 2005; Moulaert et al., 2001) within the post-colonial Global South. The role of the ‘good’ state in guaranteeing a continuation of social innovative initiatives, as we learn it from the Western/North trajectory, does not exist within such context. To say it more correctly, in the so-called South there are different kinds of ‘state’ that are performing and transforming or coming into being (Lund, 2006, 2016) with trajectories that are completely different to where the SI was originally theorised (cf. Balagangadhara & Keppens, 2009; Bhambra, 2014).

    Through empirical cases of social movements, we would like to examine how the SI vocabularies of ‘human and social needs’ are re-defined into ‘rights to be claimed’. This examination unfolds at the same time the complex categorisations of ‘modern state’ and ‘citizenship’.

    Instead of being merely objects of policy, individuals and communities are also subjects of politics. Within social movements, we imagine that there are innovative moments –if not revolutionary (cf. Lazar, 2014) –in which individual political subjects become collective agencies that institutionally matter (cf. Spivak, 2005) for the desired changes. Diverse characteristics of different-yet-connected social movements not only reflect the multidimensionality and multiscalarity of social conflicts and their territorialities (see also Angelo & Wachsmuth, 2015; Brenner, 2001; Cook & Swyngedouw, 2012; González, 2006; Leitner, 2006; Loftus, 2009a, 2009b; Oosterlynck & González, 2013; Tulumello, 2016; Van Dyck & Van den Broeck, 2013; Walker, 2014), but also express different meanings of community collective actions. Social movements seek not only to ease the on-going conflicts or push some (technical) solutions to collectivelyidentified problems, but also actively define what ‘the state’ possibly could be.

    In seeking to understand what citizenships in practice are, instead of what they should be (see Eilenberg, 2012; Lazar, 2013; Li, 2007; Ong, 1996; Wilson, 2015), this workshop pays attention to both shorter-term and longer-term aims of collective actions within a wide varying range of social movements in the South: stemming from specific sectoral political economy (farming, mining, manufacturing industries, etc.) or from particular territorial conflicts in regards to land and resources or infrastructures (see among others Choplin & Ciavolella, 2016; de Souza, 2006; Lazar, 2015; Ranganathan, 2014; Shiva, 2002). 

  • Call for Papers

    We welcome papers to be collectively discussed.
    Send your proposal for a contribution to Prathiwi Widyatmi Putri at pwidyatmi@yahoo.com, hermes2017@RISEUP.NET .
    Please mention “Contribution Hermes 2017” as a subject of your mail.


  • Session 3.2. Beyond the here and now: design activism for permanence and resilience

    OPEN SESSION

    Chair: Daniel Mallo & Armelle Tardiveau (Newcastle University)

  • Session Details

    Under the umbrella of social design, design activism and other forms of socially engaged design have contributed significantly to the deployment of innovative democratic practices in the transformation of urban space. Recent scholarship on design activism and participation highlight a notable impulse that is overtly social, political and/or environmentally minded. Such practices allegedly mediate political concerns and everyday preoccupations, more than often, by way of temporary interventions that are reflected in the literature as moments of intensification, disruption, performativity or demonstration. It seems timely, in the present climate of scarcity and fierce competition for public funding, to examine beyond the here and now, if activism should also address issues of permanence and resilience and how.

    Can the matters of concern that arise alongside participatory/activist actions survive beyond the funded period of such initiatives? Can the focus of social design shift from moments of intensity to sustained becoming? What are the implications for activist practice when initial disruptions are designed to give way to a process of citizen empowerment? Is co-production, understood as the engagement of citizens into action, a new paradigm for design activism?

  • Call for Papers

    Send your proposal for a contribution to Daniel Mallo daniel.mallo@newcastle.ac.uk, hermes2017@RISEUP.NET .
    Please mention “Contribution Hermes 2017” as a subject of your mail.


  • Session 3.3. Collective imagination

    OPEN SESSION

    Jan Schreurs, Michael Kaethler (KULeuven)

  • Session Details

    Participatory and transdisciplinary processes are in need of constructing collective imaginaries. Those imaginaries are sources of creativity and innovation, and catalysts for trust and engagement. We know most participants of the conference master or understand skills that can help to generate and articulate such imaginaries in a collective way. This session seeks to identify participants who want to share their knowledge and experience by engaging in a workshop-like activity. 

    We do want to go beyond the traditional 'creative approach' of vision making or collective imaginaries capturing based on communicative rationality. Indeed our imaginaries and visions remain tucked away in a world unknown to our rational cognition. The idea is that arts-inspired approaches can seduce imaginaries out of participants and activate those in a ‘mimetic’ or metaphoric way. Indeed our inclination to participate in co-deciding, co-designing and co-producing are motivated primarily by feelings of connectedness, inclusiveness, mutuality, trust… 

    Which kind of imaginary is helpful in creating those feelings? In line with an important focus of the conference, we believe imaginaries for ‘commoning’ are crucial: horizontality, solidarity, equality…, sharing, expanding, transforming… A precise format for the activity is not developed yet. Most probably playful psycho-geographic mappings built on homologues between space, body and language will be introduced, developed and experienced. 

    Participation is open. There is no need for inscriptions beforehand.